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bewildered
Sunday, 8 June 2008 at 6:52pm
Wednesday, 18 July 2018 at 2:44pm
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page 1 of 59 recent posts

Thread: Long term academia

posted
18-Jul-18, 15:02
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posted about 19 hours ago
I know from historian colleagues that the market in that subject is very tough so I think you're right to think that stepping straight into a lectureship or a postdoc is the exception not the rule. And many people never get there even if they pick up p/t teaching for years. I think there are several things that might be worth you thinking about.
How geographically mobile are you? The less you can move, the fewer possible institutions you can work for and so the chances of it working out diminish.
How prepared are you to work at institutions very different to the one you are at? For the majority of institutions in this country, teaching and admin form a large part of the day to day role in the humanities, research can get sidelined. And students will be much less well-prepared than you are used to if you have studied at elite institutions.
Being a lecturer is very different from dong a PhD or a postdoc, and for some people the admin side comes as an unpleasant shock. Would you relish running a degree programme or acting as the departmental main point of call for students in difficulties? Or is that wholly unappealing?
Here's a resource that I personally think is very useful on academic careers and whether it's the right choice:

Thread: Conference Comittees

posted
18-Jul-18, 14:47
edited about 3 seconds later
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posted about 20 hours ago
These sorts of activities are useful in terms of socialisation. Once you've got a bit of experience locally, you might want to consider getting involved in the postgraduate / early career network of a professional association in your field. That's the sort of thing that is both useful in network building and getting your name known in your profession, but also sends signals that you're collegiate on your cv, which is definitely a good thing in my experience.

Thread: Long term academia

posted
16-Jul-18, 16:05
edited about 19 seconds later
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posted about 2 days ago
From your last paragraph, I think you'd hate academia. The actual job is very different to a PhD and if you're entrepreneurial you'd find the admin side frustrating.

Thread: Politic - Pay scholarship back? Should I?

posted
09-Jul-18, 23:42
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posted about 1 week ago
It's also Canada not England. Rules may differ...

Thread: Black list

posted
06-Jul-18, 12:48
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posted about 1 week ago
What PM133 says. I would require the faculty head's approval if you'd failed previously and he normally says no. Only a very clear reason why you failed eg illness and why that no longer applies would convince him.

Thread: Politic - Pay scholarship back? Should I?

posted
06-Jul-18, 12:45
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posted about 1 week ago
Check what your contract / studentship agreement says. If it says you need to repay then you might want to get legal advice on the consequences if you don't - this is how major debt problems can start.

Thread: Funding for PHD after Masters ?

posted
02-Jul-18, 17:14
edited about 21 seconds later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
No problem the ESRC (your RC) funds +3 or 1+3 PhDs (and other variations). I'd ask your dept for advice whether LLM or MRes is better prep for a PhD funding application though.

Thread: Try for PhD or a Second MS

posted
11-Jun-18, 19:59
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posted about 1 month ago
Did you fail and resit any modules? If so, those marks get capped at a bare pass unless they accepted extenuating circumstances. That could explain a discrepancy. Otherwise ask the programme director why.

Thread: Jobs and postdocs in the US

posted
06-Jun-18, 20:12
edited about 12 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
If I understand the issue correctly they fall into different visa categories. Postdocs seem to be able to get J1 visas whereas a lab manager would be H1B, which is the category that Trump's cracked down on to decrease immigration. I've heard even the likes of Facebook are struggling to get that type and there are I think costs for the employer, so not worth it to employ a foreign applicant when there are qualified US citizens. Similar to the situation in the UK really, so we can't complain.

Thread: Individual Doctorate in Germany

posted
22-May-18, 11:39
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posted about 2 months ago
It is certainly possible to gain a PhD in Germany with minimal contact with the supervisor assuming you don't need access to any equipment. What I would question from the experience of friends who did just that, is whether it's worth it. The two people I know got nothing career wise from it, just the title. It seems that if you are not involved in the day-to-day activities of the 'Lehrstuhl' (I have no idea what this is in English sorry - there's no real equivalent), then you are very unlikely to benefit from the professor's patronage, which is crucial for getting academic jobs in Germany in my social science field at least. So maybe the question is why do you want to do a PhD?

Thread: The Viva From Hell!

posted
22-May-18, 11:29
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posted about 2 months ago
Congratulations Hannah a) on surviving b) on clearly having such an interesting thesis that they could talk so long about it and c) on the good result! First, wait until you get the formal report - that should list exactly what changes need to be made. If you've got 3 months they will despite being labelled major be relatively limited. When you get the report, agree with your supervisor what you are going to do on each point and be incredibly systematic. Make a timetable, keep track of exactly where in the thesis you have addressed each point and just work through them. In some ways as they're broken down into chunks of work, it's easier to combine with a p/t job than writing a chapter from scratch. You can do this - one last push and you're there.

Thread: hard choice between two potential supervisors

posted
10-May-18, 19:03
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posted about 2 months ago
One minor point: if you need a tier 4 visa your travel plans may not be compatible with the monitoring measures used by universities to check visa compliance eg regular signing in and supervision meetings.

Thread: What are PhD supervisors for?

posted
03-May-18, 15:02
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posted about 2 months ago
If I remember your previous posts, your first supervisor raised doubts about the original proposal and suggested alternatives so you changed supervisor, only to discover that someone had indeed already done your project and you are now struggling to come up with a new project? Is that right? If so, might it be worth swallowing your pride and thinking again about the alternatives the first supervisor suggested? I assume you are nearing the point where upgrade starts to become a problem, so maybe going with one of her ideas would at least mean it's likely to be a viable project and give you a decent chance of progression.

Thread: Demanding critical and controlling PhD advisor - I need Help

posted
03-May-18, 14:56
edited about 19 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
It sounds like she is concerned about you meeting deadlines and including all the expected elements in the thesis - that's her job to ensure you are kept on track to complete in a timely fashion. You on the other hand see this as interference in your creative endeavors and feel you don't need this input. You can do what the others suggest and push back, assuming you know best BUT I've seen this go horribly wrong for students in their viva, when the major revisions ended up being what the supervisor had suggested including all along. Particularly, if the advice is around showing awareness of a particular strand of literature or justifying your theoretical and methodological choices more thoroughly, I'd take it on board as they tend to be the things that when left out lead to a year's corrections for social scientists.

Thread: PhD or job? Help please!

posted
09-Apr-18, 14:49
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posted about 3 months ago
I went into the CS fast stream after my MA although policy not social research. Some of my MA friends went on to do PhDs, and none went into academia though most had wanted to - they ended up generally in policy type jobs whether government, NGO or consultancy. I did a PhD after 5 years of the CS as I was fed up. I did end up in academia. I think the 5 years CS experience made me a better PhD student as I had project management skills, was a lot more resilient and was quicker to pick up on the game that needed to be played. I don't think there's a right or wrong decision for you. One doesn't rule out the other. The one thing that would make me tend to going into the CS would be your MH problems - you might find the CS to be a better environment for getting better than a PhD. There's something to be said for comparative stability, relative financial comfort and the ability to plan ahead for a few years compared to the roller-coaster of uncertainty that a PhD is.
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