Overview of frere_damas

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frere_damas
Tuesday, 1 September 2015 at 11:58am
Wednesday, 6 July 2016 at 2:59pm
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Thread: Question about post-viva job applications

posted
07-Jul-16, 17:21
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posted about 3 years ago
Thanks for the tips, looks like that's the case.

It's a sad sense of reassurance that the numbers are normal! Getting jobs in the field shouldn't be this hard. =/

Thread: Question about post-viva job applications

posted
06-Jul-16, 15:19
edited about 9 seconds later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 3 years ago
Quote From TreeofLife:
I don't have experience in this, but my advice to you is apply anyway. That seems such a small thing for a potential employer to be hung up on. I think if you have the skill set they are looking for and a PhD, they don't really care about the undergrad result.


I agree with you, and I do apply anyway. I'm just thinking of anything and everything related to having a succesful job application and how to write a better one. So far I've had four rejections out of six applications, and I'm writing at least another three over the next week or so.

Thread: Question about post-viva job applications

posted
06-Jul-16, 15:01
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 3 years ago
Hi. I'm currently looking at jobs, and I was wondering how to read into some of the job specifications. Some of them mention that a first degree is essential, even with a PhD. Is this something that is still, in practical terms, considered essential or is there some leeway on this? I have a 2:1 from a BSc and a MSc on top of a PhD so I imagine it wouldn't be a probem. However, those of you with experience in this, I'd like to hear from you.

Thread: Masters Dissertation in 3 months?

posted
30-May-16, 13:22
edited a moment later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 3 years ago
Quote From Shelley2016:
I'm nearing the end of my lectures on my MA full time and I am due to start my 18,000 word dissertation around the middle of June with a hand in date of 14th September. I am doing the Masters full time and was told when I applied that I could do the whole thing in a year (including the dissertation over the summer). However, now my lecturer has approached me and suggested I switch to part time to give me more time to do it as people who have done the dissertation over 3 months in the past have lost marks because it was a bit of a squeeze.

My question is, is it possible to do a Masters Dissertation over 3 months? I have a very part-time job (10 hours a week, live away from home so no family commitments and no kids etc) so I can pretty much dedicate my days to it.


I did my MSc in very similar conditions. I kept to full-time and it was a massive rush; I had to set a daily quota of writing about 1,000-1,500 words and it wasn't pleasant. I received a good enough grade to go on to a PhD but it could've been a lot better. Part of it was poor time management on my behalf, and generally being quite poor at lit reviews. I'd say that time management is more important than whether you do it part- or full-time.

Thread: How did you come up with your title?

posted
20-May-16, 09:28
edited about 29 seconds later
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posted about 3 years ago
I had a provisional one throughout my PhD and kept it at the end. It's more important that it's informative than "sexy". Don't try to be too clever with it or you might come across as flippant. As my supervisor says, finishing a PhD is very much about impression management. By all means if you come up with something that is informative *and* sexy go for it, but just make sure that yo know which one is the more important one.

Thread: What can I expect?

posted
20-May-16, 09:22
edited about 29 seconds later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 3 years ago
It was hell, pure unadulterated hell.

Just kidding!

Use your first year to read up as much as you can and to do the training courses. After your first year you'll have less time for that, especially if you plan on teaching alongside doing your PhD. Also, if you don't need ethical clearance for your data collection or get it done really quickly then, obviously, first year can be a lot of data collection. Generally it's good to be proactive.

Thread: working while writing up

posted
10-Apr-16, 15:45
edited about 21 seconds later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 3 years ago
Depends what you can handle. At one point I was doing a PhD and two jobs (demonstrating at uni and waitering). I dropped the waitering about a year and a half ago to focus on my work. I can't financially maintain myself this way (I get some help from my parents) but I had to prioritise my PhD over work or it'd never get done. Have a think and see what works for you, if you can handle it then good. If not, perhaps having family to help might prove to be a lifesaver!

Thread: Funded PhD with 2:2 + MSc (pass)

posted
23-Dec-15, 13:46
edited about 14 seconds later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 4 years ago
What did you get from your MSc? I'd imagine that grade to be at least as important as the undergraduate grade.

Thread: Funding for travel during PhD

posted
13-Sep-15, 16:52
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 4 years ago
Ask your department? My university's graduate school offers funding awards that the departments then have to match. E.g., if I get £400 from the grad school my department will give me another £400. Plus you might also get an expenses allowance. My department has that, although they don't advertise it very widely.

Also, be warned that Norway is an expensive country!

Thread: 2:2 BSc and MSc, should I not bother to apply to Oxbridge at all?

posted
13-Sep-15, 16:48
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 4 years ago
Why does Oxbridge matter? If you're talking about doing a PhD having the supervisor with the right expertise and interest in your work is far more important than the institution you attend.

I do wonder how you got on to a MSc with a 2:2 degree. I don't mean this to be critical at all. If anything, it shows you can be resourceful!

Thread: PhD and relationships

posted
03-Sep-15, 09:25
edited about 3 seconds later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From awsoci:

When I think about my own experiences, while not in a romantic sense, I've generally actively avoided engaging with academics from hard sciences like biology, physics and maths. The reason behind this is at the few mixers of which I've attended, a number of the academics I met in these areas were very condescending towards me and my work. The minute I state that I work in the social sciences, my scholarship (despite not asking me anything about what my focus is or what I even do in the social sciences!) is rendered invalid and uninteresting. Comments like 'oh you're from the arts' or 'oh, that's cute' can be quite frustrating and very dismissive, and the conversation either shuts down, or they continue to talk about their work.


Straying off topic a bit, you should read an article called "Death and Furniture" by Edwards, Ashmore & Potter (1995) for a deliberately sassy reply to that kind of attitude. It's not going to get you a romantic partner, but at least you'll have something to say back to the condescending attitude!

Thread: qualitative quotes

posted
01-Sep-15, 15:23
edited about 4 seconds later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 4 years ago
It depends on your analytical approach as well as the type of transcription you use. For example, Jeffersonian transcription requires a strict adherence to what is said rather than what is grammatically correct.

So the question to ask is how far will such a correction impact your analysis and make a decision based on that.

Thread: PhD and relationships

posted
01-Sep-15, 12:20
edited about 13 seconds later
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From TreeofLife:
I think I said that having the opportunity to do a PhD indicates that someone has probably had a decent upbringing, meaning that there's many people who could do a PhD or have a great job but events in their life have meant that they haven't been able to fulfil their potential.


But also surely there's people who simply choose not to do a PhD because they find no fulfilment in it? I mean, can we really say that their potential is unfulfilled if they've chosen not do a PhD? My father chose not to go to university when he was young and he is one of the most intelligent and happy people I've ever met - hardly someone I'd refer to as unfulfilled potential.

Thread: PhD and relationships

posted
01-Sep-15, 12:12
Avatar for frere_damas
posted about 4 years ago
Quote From TreeofLife:
At no point have I said I think I am better than others because I have a PhD. All I have said is that I like to surround myself with intelligent people - whether that's family members, friends or boyfriends. Generally, someone with a degree and someone with a PhD is likely to be more intelligent than someone without. That's it.


You're being overly optimistic about the quality of modern education. I'm towards the end of my PhD now and through most of my studies I've come across people who haven't cared much for their education at all. University is just about partying for them. Put that kind of a person against someone who left college to work full-time and it's not hard to guess which of the two gets my respect. Of course I don't mean all university students here, but many are in uni just to party and avoid work. That's hardly an image of intelligence to me.

Yes, PhDs can be lonely but at the end of the day we, the PhD students, are the odd ones out and not the rest. Truth is most people haven't got a clue as to what we do and will struggle to relate. I'm sure you don't feel it as snobbery to want to surround yourself with intelligent people, but be cautious about the implicit assumptions such a desire can carry with it.

As for the earlier jargon comment by the post originator. My rule is this: If you're an author and you're misunderstood then it's your fault and not the readers. Same would apply to the use of jargon in conversations. If I was to start using psychological terms in everyday conversations I would just end up annoying people, not intimidating them.
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