Overview of pm133

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pm133
Friday, 8 January 2016 at 12:02am
Thursday, 19 July 2018 at 12:07am
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Thread: Enough data for a PhD?

posted
18-Jul-18, 03:43
by pm133
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posted about 1 day ago
Quote From MissyL:
Some of us really struggle with the PhD process and aren't capable of writing papers solely on our own. Get off your high horse.


Quote From MissyL:
I am well aware that the core aim of a PhD is to generate publication quality work.
However, it doesn't work out that way for everyone.
If I had published papers/was capable of publishing papers ASAP, I would not have asked for advice.


It is unwise to starting shrieking at someone who is trying to advise you. I was actually criticising your supervisor was for not getting you to write your own papers and then supervise you through that. Sadly, rather than ask me for clarification on my comment, you decided to shout me down like a 14 year old child. It seems to be something young people do these days. That is Strike One.

Sadly, you only get one strike from me.
Perhaps others will help you now. I am out of this discussion. Too old to put up with childish petulance.

Thread: Long term academia

posted
18-Jul-18, 03:32
edited about 3 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 day ago
CannonKing, I absolutely agree you don't want to go through that without knowing whether it's worth it. As TQ says above, you really need to focus on gaining knowledge of exactly what the job will entail if successful.
I went through the same process and came to the conclusion that I would rather lick the pavement for a month than spend a single day as an academic as I described above; on the other hand, others will happily and willingly spend a decade or more trying to gain a full time position doing exactly this job. I personally know of someone who haunted a university for 17 years before getting his first permanent job and I have several former colleagues who were around 40 years of age before finding their first permanent gig. You might be in for a long ride. It's as well to know the risk of that up front.

You are already venting so I wonder whether you really are in this for the long run. Also, you mentioned you were at a RG uni. Is that relevant to your struggle? Did you expect that to make a difference to your career prospects?

Thread: Conference Comittees

posted
18-Jul-18, 03:26
edited about 1 minute later
by pm133
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posted about 1 day ago
Things will only "look good on your CV" if you actually want a job which will require you to do more of the same.
If you want to be seen as an organiser then I would certainly put this on your CV.
If you don't want to be asked to perform these types of role then I would avoid any mention of it.

I would recommend passing on the following advice to your PhD office. It is not healthy to think of a CV as a way to get jobs. Obviously that is the desired outcome but focussing on that seriously risks leading to crap careers. You start "CV filling" - putting all manner of rubbish on there because you think it will look good to a prospective employer. A better mindset is to realise that a CV is a marketing tool designed to describe the dream jobs you want to do, full of evidence regarding how you have demonstrated your suitability for those roles. When I took that advice on board over 20 years ago it was a career defining change for me.

Thread: Enough data for a PhD?

posted
17-Jul-18, 15:02
by pm133
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posted about 1 day ago
I dont understand why you are not writing your own papers but it seems that this is a depressingly common theme these days.
It is possible to pass a viva without papers but it might be more difficult to prove you have done sonething worthwhile. It leaves you a bit more vulnerable on that score.

Thread: Long term academia

posted
17-Jul-18, 14:59
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 day ago
CannonKing,
Do you know what an academic career entails?
You will only know whether it worth it if you know what it involves.
From what I have seen and discussed with full time academics, they usualyy perform almost no research personally. Postdocs and postgrads are hired for that. A bit of teaching and exam setting/marking etc. A ton of administrative stuff to keep the department operational and constant funding seeking and applying and paper writing, reviewing.

It's a glorified admin job.
Industry is full of these types of job with no PhD required.
Is this really what you are after? If so, go for it.

Thread: PhD and Pregnancy

posted
17-Jul-18, 14:49
edited about 26 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 day ago
A PhD is all consuming.
Having a baby is all consuming too.
If you do both at the same time something will have to give regardless of how much support you have behind you.
It is likely you will have to compromise on both although there are people out there who will wrongly attempt to convince you that you can have it all.
One of these will be have to take priority for you and the other will suffer as a consequence compared to the situation where you do one at a time.
You have a big decision to make.

Thread: Enough data for a PhD?

posted
16-Jul-18, 12:19
by pm133
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posted about 2 days ago
How many papers do you have?

Thread: A terrible supervisor

posted
16-Jul-18, 12:05
by pm133
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posted about 2 days ago
Firstly, there is no such thing as a "star" in academia.
Period.
People need to stop white knighting other people because it leads to more problems than I have time to write about.

Secondly, were you sent an information pack and/or a written contract by the university? All of your obligations should have been detailed in there.

Thread: PhD and Pregnancy

posted
16-Jul-18, 11:58
edited about 1 minute later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 2 days ago
Leaving aside the difficulty you will face having a baby to look after whilst also doing a PhD, you actually have nothing to tell your potential supervisor because you are not pregnant. Nor can you put any credible timetable on when you will do so. Nature has a tendency not to work like that. All of my kids (now fully grown up) took different times to be conceived.
She is certainly not entitled by law or any other measure to know that you are attempting to get pregnant.

If you fall pregnant during the PhD, if UK based, you will be entitled to maternity pay.

Thread: PhD stipend and student loan repayments

posted
13-Jul-18, 16:16
edited about 21 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 5 days ago
Quote From henrytudorvii:
Hi All,

I will be starting a PhD soon, and had a question regarding student loan repayments since my situation is a bit odd.

Wanted to ask if anyone knows whether PhD stipends count as income towards student loan repayments. Without going into too much detail, I have supplementary income that is below the income tax threshold, including some from an ISA, and am certain that I will cross the repayment threshold.

Would PhD stipends count as income to the SLC?

Thanks,


Your stipend is tax free and doesnt count towards anything like that.
You dont need to declare it to HMRC and so it wont affect your repayments liability.
If I am wrong about this could someone please tell me ASAP because I will owe HMRC a fortune :)

Thread: Will I be too old to apply for Ph.D. at the age of 30

posted
13-Jul-18, 16:11
edited about 6 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 5 days ago
Graduated at 48 and I am mentally sharper and more focussed than I ever was as a 20 something.
Age is absolutely meaningless.
Attitude is everything.

Thread: Revise and resubmit-passed viva exam second time round!

posted
12-Jul-18, 23:36
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 6 days ago
One way to cope with trying to ignore what others are doing in comparison is to remember that a career is a marathon and not a sprint. The person who has blown away everyone at the age of 25 with a ton of papers, awards, prizes and applause still has to sustain a 40+ year career, still has to figure out the meaning of their own life, still has to negotiate their midlife crises (more than one), still has to go through decisions about life partners, marriage, children, buying a house, pensions, friendships, loneliness, illness, death and a vast host of other things.
In essence we are all the same and no amount of career success will change the fact that when we are dead, within a few years we will be forgotten along with all our opinions and achievements. Even our own great grandchildren probably wont know we existed.
We are riding around on a tiny rock (Earth) which is spinning around a vast ocean of empty space. Nothing matters really so dont sweat the small stuff.

None of that was meant to sound depressing at all. It is quite a liberating thought when you consider it.

Thread: IP Theft

posted
11-Jul-18, 17:31
edited about 26 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 week ago
This sort of thing seems to happen all the time.
It is one of the reasons why I resist talking to anyone about ongoing work or potential future work in any sort of forum until I have either published it or at least am almost ready to submit.
People just cannot be trusted in such a competitive arena as academia.

Thread: PhD fellow vs PhD candidate

posted
11-Jul-18, 10:54
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 week ago
OK to me candidate sounds a bit passive in that sense.
Student sounds more pro active.

Thread: Applying for RA positions instead of role requiring PhD...

posted
10-Jul-18, 23:29
edited about 17 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 1 week ago
Time for bed I think lol.
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