Overview of pm133

Overview

Avatar placeholder
pm133
Friday, 8 January 2016 at 12:02am
Tuesday, 18 February 2020 at 12:03am
1153
Login to send a private message to pm133
page 1 of 77 recent posts

Thread: Weird question about potential collaboration / etiquette etc

posted
12-Nov-19, 15:22
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 months ago
You are probably overthinking this a bit but I have learned not to trust anyone in academia so you are right to be at least aware of the potential for problems up front.

To protect yourself I would be very clear about what specific questions I wanted to ask and to limit that number.
You also have a chance to network with someone who could be a potential future collaborator. From that perspective I would focus on developing the relationship more generally.

If you are put on the spot tell him you will seek clarification from your supervisor.

Sounds very positive at this stage though.

Thread: Campus Closure.

posted
11-Nov-19, 13:09
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 months ago
To be honest, I'm surprised that this situation doesn't happen more often as quite a few universities are flirting with financial disaster.

Unfortunately I would expect your supervisor is probably more worried about their own problems right
now so that response doesn't surprise me.

Does the funding belong to you or the university? You might be able to switch it to a new supervisor at another institute.

Is there not a Universities commission or council or something that you could contact?

Thread: I a m in need of advice

posted
11-Nov-19, 13:04
edited about 28 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 months ago
I would suggest that it is very rare to fail a viva if you have published work.
It can happen though.

In the viva you need to demonstrate that you have undertaken sufficient quality and quantity of work and yo must also demonstrate that this work is your own. Do both of those and I'd be very surprised if you failed.

Thread: Thesis as collection of articles

posted
05-Nov-19, 05:54
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 3 months ago
Same here. All my thesis chapters were from my published works with the exception of a theoretical background chapter.
I rephrased each paper to avoid any nonsense over "self plagiarism".

Thread: PhD with 2:2 MChem possible?

posted
26-Oct-19, 13:31
edited about 4 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Jamie, my advice was directed towards the original poster and was given in good faith.
What is not helpful is people like you jumping in with unwarranted personal attacks like you did in that first sentence.
We are not high school children so please cut it out.

For the benefit of doubt, I mentioned my 2:2 to demonstrate that I know what I am talking about because I have actually been in their shoes and also to show one of the ways to get around and fix a low grade and then succeed at PhD level. Nothing to do with inadequacy at all. That was a ridiculous interpretation of my advice.

Thread: PhD with 2:2 MChem possible?

posted
25-Oct-19, 14:17
edited about 3 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago

If you said that people do get into PhDs with 2:2s, I suppose you know of some examples? Any in STEM? And why would you not recommend it? In my case I did fine on my research projects but screwed up on exams in 1st sem 4th year, which is what sunk my grades.


Yes I know of at least 2 or 3 in the department I was studying at alone. All of them had 2:2 grades and all were in STEM.
Two of them did not graduate with a PhD.

The reason I would not recommend it is that with a 2:2, you have not developed the theoretical background or discipline on which to found your PhD. A PhD is not just about being able to cope with research projects. It's about developing a deep understanding of what you are doing and why. In 9 months you'll have to demonstrate that theoretical underpinning in a VIVA and if you fail it your PhD could be over before it even starts. How confident do you feel that you can correct this background knowledge gap in just 9 months in addition to demonstrating sufficient lab progress to warrant keeping you on the programme? That's what you've got to ask yourself.

As for getting places with a 2:2, most funded PhD positions probably only attract a few applicants unless the researcher is particularly famous (unlikely) or you are talking about Oxford or Cambridge. The minimum 2:1 or 1st restriction is not really a restriction. If you are the only candidate they will definitely make an exception rather than hand the funding money back.

Bear in mind, this is only my opinion. I was in the same boat. Got a 2:2 first time round and went back and upped it to a 1st before going for the PhD. I couldn't have made it without fixing my degree knowledge first. You need to decide for yourself.

Thread: PhD with 2:2 MChem possible?

posted
24-Oct-19, 11:26
edited about 9 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
You should be considering whether a 2:2 is a sufficient baseline for a PhD rather than worrying about being accepted for a position.
In my opinion, you shouldn't be thinking about a PhD unless you have a 1st or a very good 2:1.
Having said that, people do get into PhD funded positions with 2:2 grades. I just wouldn't recommend it.

Thread: Viva Questions...

posted
11-Oct-19, 10:31
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Honestly, if this is what you end up being asked I would suggest that you've passed.
They should be asking serious questions about your research, not faffing about with nonsense about "how you've personally grown as a researcher".
I would have played all of those questions with a straight bat and one sentence answers.

Not one of them is a good question to be asking in a viva other than to perhaps relax you at the start. I would be seriously annoyed at being asked them after 3 years of working my butt off.

Thread: Urgent advice on PhD offers needed! Should I accept my Australian DTP offer?!

posted
10-Oct-19, 06:16
edited about 42 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
It's not quite as bad as that rewt. :-D

You will go through incredible difficulties at times meadyorca, and you need to be doing something you feel an affinity for or you might not get through it.

Thread: I'm starting a PhD but the position I was waiting for just came out

posted
06-Oct-19, 09:49
edited about 53 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
Sandrett, you state that you like the project you are currently working on.
It looks like you are only interested in this other PI because you think it will look good on your CV.
Personally, I think this is a really bad thing to base a decision on.
You have literally no idea whether working with this PI will open doors for you or not. It will depend on how your PhD goes. If your base assumption that your CV will look better is false then you have a potentially disastrous situation on your hands and you simply cannot be certain you are right at this stage.

Unless you can convince yourself that you are doing the PhD because you love the project I would stay with what you've got.

The world is littered with utterly miserable people who chased CV enhancing stuff over their love of the work. Do you want to risk being one of them?

Thread: PhD Imposter Syndrome

posted
04-Oct-19, 17:55
edited about 2 minutes later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
If you feel that you don't deserve to be doing a PHD then presumably you also believe that everyone else in your group does deserve to be doing one.

That's flawed logic right there. I guarantee you that most of your colleagues lose sleep at night over this exact same feeling. I didn't meet too many people who didn't suffer IS at some point. Look around you. Whether they are telling you or not, I reckon at least 7 out of 10 people that you can see have these doubts.
Part of the PhD mountain is learning to stop obsessing over things which don't matter. The word "deserve" doesn't belong in the world. Nobody "deserves" anything. Everything has to be earned. You are not alone in this.

You have chosen (along with the rest of us) to spend the next few years pushing yourself to the limit academically. By definition this means spending vast amounts of time outside your comfort zone. Your brain doesn't always like that and Imposter Syndrome is one of the many shitty ways it uses to try and force you to go back inside to the warmth of your comfort zone. To stay out in the storm takes real guts which is why lesser people don't manage to get a PhD, and prefer a safe career rather than trying to run their own business etc. Imposter Syndrome is a sign that your PhD is doing what you wanted it to do - stretching you to your limit, just like rain tells you that you are outdoors. Embrace it for that reason.

Thread: PhD pulling us into different worlds

posted
04-Oct-19, 17:45
edited about 8 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 4 months ago
It sounds to me like you don't respect his life/career choices.
I have no idea why you think you are in the "real world" and he isn't. It sounds like he is doing exactly what he wants and is living in the moment. To me you can't get more real than that.
In that context, I don't think it's patronising at all. I think it comes across as pretty arrogant.

If your career was fulfilling for you, you wouldn't be focussing on what he is doing.
I think you might want to think about solving that problem before you end up losing him because unless he is blind, he'll be well aware that someone is not right in your relationship.

Thread: What methods do you use for taking notes?

posted
27-Sep-19, 21:22
edited about 9 seconds later
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 5 months ago
I used to annotate printed sheets of the lecture notes.

Thread: Average Length of PhD First Year Review?

posted
27-Sep-19, 21:21
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 5 months ago
Mine was 2 hours long.

Thread: PhD Fellowship is lower than I was told

posted
25-Sep-19, 22:58
by pm133
Avatar for pm133
posted about 5 months ago
Quote From Sandrett:

Unfortunately I don't... We spoke about the project, I visited the center and met the lab members. At the end, after I had a good feeling about everything, I asked about the money because I was going to renounce to a high fellowship and I've been told a gross annual salary and an approximate monthly net one. They were both different from the ones I've been proposed now.


Ah that's bad news. Unfortunately you've learned a painful lesson here. Not much help now but you should have waited until you got that offer in writing before turning down the MC award. Not sure what to advise here.
page 1 of 77 recent posts

Postgraduate
Forum

Copyright ©2018
All rights reserved

Postgraduate Forum

Masters Degrees

PhD Opportunities

PostgraduateForum is a trading name of FindAUniversity Ltd
FindAUniversity Ltd, 77 Sidney St, Sheffield, S1 4RG, UK. Tel +44 (0) 114 268 4940 Fax: +44 (0) 114 268 5766