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starryeyed
Sunday, 24 November 2013 at 9:59pm
Wednesday, 9 May 2018 at 12:29pm
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Thread: When to start writing thesis

posted
09-May-18, 12:30
edited about 2 minutes later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
What's the field? In life sciences generally there is no reason to do it unless your project is complete and you don't do experiments anymore. Completing figures on the current basis is advisable, especially that PI wants you to present the results (to other students ect.) as soon as you have it.

Thread: Demanding critical and controlling PhD advisor - I need Help

posted
08-May-18, 11:10
edited about 6 minutes later
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posted about 2 weeks ago
I tend to have this problem in communication. I tend to be direct and I like people being direct with me, since I can't really read between the lines - usually I'd ask the supervisor or the colleague for it early on. It's a trait that is often present in academia. Some people I know tended to get offended, because they interpreted it as orders - since then I've learned to tone down with them, usually mellowed voice tone helps.
It might be that she is a very energetic person that does not want to lose time when she feels you drift off (or she herself drifts off). After all, if a thing needs to be done, it needs to be done, and it's hard to hold yourself back and let the student figure out the answer when you already know it. I also feel this might be a generational issue. You might talk about it gently with her, and assert yourself. I know that I'd be quite confused and probably ashamed if this popped out during my talk with a student. This type of people loves to do lists and presentations, so if you show them, and show that you are on time, things become clear and she feels she might be more hands off.

Thread: Citing Authors I haven't read

posted
23-Apr-18, 09:33
edited about 4 minutes later
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posted about 1 month ago
This will be a horrible thing I'm proposing here, but given the choice I'd pirate the book in question. Being true to the knowledge is more important in this case. Misquoting a source - if one person makes a mistake in citation and the rest replicates it - is very harmful for research. There were several times I'd actually look into the paper I was supposed to cite and turned out that the source was simplified by the review to the point of misinterpretation, and I learned.
If it's a rare gem, you might consider writing to the author for the excerpt you need.

Thread: I am afraid of a panic attack , while teaching....

posted
19-Apr-18, 11:40
edited about 46 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
I'd prepare as much as I can and if I don't know something, I'd just say that I don't know/remember, but I'd direct them to the source (for example, a book). And pretend that I'm explaining it to my little brother. It gets better with habit. Anxiety tends to disappear when something is really well rehearsed.

Thread: I am afraid of a panic attack , while teaching....

posted
19-Apr-18, 10:59
edited about 12 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
I usually direct myself inwards when I do the presentation and I focus on the presentation itself, like I'm playing in a movie or a school play. I don't look people in the eyes, just at the audience like it's a blurred image. To the outside observer I seem confident and outspoken, I decompose only after I've finished and I have time to think about the performance. It's similar to a lot of people, I guess.
I had clinical panic attacks and anxiety disorder, and still did presentations then. I'd rehearse the whole thing at my home before, several times, and two days before. Then I'd behave like a tape recorder. It worked. (anxiety disorders eventually dissolve when treated behaviorally).

Thread: Should I quite my high paying job for a full-time PhD

posted
13-Apr-18, 10:40
edited about 6 seconds later
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posted about 1 month ago
What you need is a health break, not a PhD. Several months, probably. Enough to make space in your brain that urges to be filled, and then you'll know your next passion in IT, and probably remember why you started it in the first place. I'd go for some therapy as well. Adding stress (which making a PhD is) to the burnout may turn out ugly.
If you yearn for intellectual development, and are bored, it's better to try to attend free lectures and some courses, and take in novelties without commitment to deliver. This will also boost creativity and help to break out from overspecialization. You may also join some projects as a freelance if you know people.

Thread: Feeling lost due to the strike

posted
28-Mar-18, 20:21
edited about 21 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Wow, if you have academic teacher strikes, things must look very bleak indeed. I don't know a group with a stronger work ethics.
Here it's similar with medical doctors.

Thread: Looking dumb in front of my supervisor

posted
23-Mar-18, 07:14
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posted about 2 months ago
I was scared out of my mind of my PI at my PhD for the whole first year. Then I've figured out that he just has a loud voice, probably trained to conduct lectures.

Thread: Looking dumb in front of my supervisor

posted
21-Mar-18, 17:54
edited about 5 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
http://jcs.biologists.org/content/121/11/1771 Always good to remind.

Thread: Quiting PhD - Terms and conditions

posted
19-Mar-18, 17:53
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posted about 2 months ago
Try to find out if it's possible to get a year off and extension, also a therapist (possibly starting within your institution, if there is any). You can always return then, after you heal a bit, and complete the thesis.
If you don't want to, as mentioned above, seek help of the student's advisor, because health reasons are perfectly ok for quitting (you probably need some sort of evaluation from a psychiatrist) and perhaps you don't have to return anything.

Thread: Is she a good supervisor?

posted
14-Mar-18, 10:54
edited about 14 minutes later
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posted about 2 months ago
She looks like she's very okay for PhDs and not okay for postdocs. Safe research is what you want to do at your PhD, it's the postdoc job to disarm landmines. If I'd were to guess, she's one of the younger in the staff and has no power to stand up for you when the senior profs are involved. She might understand that you want to try somewhere else, because if she understands the plight of a researcher, she also will understand you want to boost your career by changing the focus and going to different places. She might even offer help if you do explain it nicely.
Now a word of warning, most of the time it's your job to know the details of your project, and most of the time supervisors don't know everything. It's also good if they don't, because it's a sign you are becoming a specialist in your area.

Thread: In need of advice from those more mature in their academic careers: post-docs or even PI’s

posted
14-Mar-18, 10:13
edited about 43 minutes later
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posted about 2 months ago
That's what I was trying to say: you don't have to look like a superhero and you don't have to be praised to do good science. Sometimes it is possible to look quite the opposite and still do a very good job. Also, I'm not giving up on getting funding, and this time I'm not going to get sick just in time for the proposal deadlines for my career stage (I've spent over a week in a hospital and I was still trying to write from there - stopped only when they told me there's no other way than surgery. Sometimes bad luck is bad...). If it was almost there in the panel for the biggest grant in the scheme, it might get the smaller one.

Thread: In need of advice from those more mature in their academic careers: post-docs or even PI’s

posted
14-Mar-18, 07:36
edited about 2 minutes later
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posted about 2 months ago
I didn't get prizes when I was a PhD student. I've started out four years later, which in the eyes of scientific community means I must be dumber than the rest (a lot of "young scientist" grants has a literal age cap). I was one of these awkward, bumbly blonde girls you meet at the corridor everyday, not the talented one, really. But I've finished it with very good papers and then my PhD was awarded with a distinction, which is a rare ocurrence. Despite all my troubles at the postdoc - which were not my fault, or not the PI's, just science being science and hypotheses not working as the state of art was implying, I've found something very real and probably a breakthrough and I want to stay because I want to find out what it is. If someone finances the dumb postdoc, I guess - but they don't look at my face when they read my proposal. I was told it almost made it and the sole reason it was not funded that I was competing with people like my own PI for this particular grant, actually very literally with him. It's not appearances that matter.

Thread: Immediate publications (1-6 months) or wait a bit?

posted
12-Mar-18, 11:57
edited about 3 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
I think you must first state what you're doing PhD in. Because in my area you have to make experiments first so you have anything to write about :D

Thread: Career advice - second postdoc

posted
12-Mar-18, 09:55
edited about 5 seconds later
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posted about 2 months ago
Thank you. Actually I did commit sort of career suicide choosing to stay in the country and do a domestic postdoc, for the sake of founding a family, which had failed in a spectacular way and I'm also a bit traumatized by that. I was also looking around for jobs outside academia, but I have no idea what those people do. It would be a horror to be stuck in a job where you have to do the same thing all the time - I'd be interested for the first six months, and then I'd bore out. Is there any other job for an ex-scientist that includes learning, improving stuff and analyzing?
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