Overview of Tudor_Queen

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Tudor_Queen
Wednesday, 18 November 2015 at 11:56am
Wednesday, 1 July 2020 at 1:37pm
2002
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Thread: What can I expect?

posted
18-May-16, 10:43
edited about 20 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
I heard the write from the start advice too. And so I tried to write a bit each day about what I'd read and my thoughts about where the project could go. I didn't use much of those early writings but it did help A LOT as I felt like I was doing something - whereas simply reading can feel a bit less tangible. Also, I think that what I was reading stuck a bit more, and so I probably did use the things I wrote, I just didn't directly copy and paste them into the literature review.

Thread: Mres and PhD

posted
17-May-16, 09:59
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posted about 4 years ago
I agree with TreeofLife. Good luck!!!

Thread: problem with one of the lecturers in the department

posted
17-May-16, 08:55
edited about 19 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
I really hope things get better for you soon. I have to say that since reading your response I have changed my mind about my initial advice. If you say that your supervisor will protect you, so as to speak, then what are you actually worried about? Your work will show how good you are, not her comments.

If people already recognize that she is a bit unstable and untrustworthy, I do not think you need to worry about her comments having any impact.

On the other hand, if you raise it as an issue, I think you might end up regretting it - as nothing may actually come of it. Then it would make you feel more upset/frustrated. I think if I were in your shoes I would focus all my energy on ignoring her and what she has said, and getting productive again with my work. If what she says consumes you, then she has actually won!

Thread: Mres and PhD

posted
17-May-16, 08:46
edited about 57 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
Hi SocialJen, absolutely - the PhD can simply continue on from the MRes project. For some people it is like having an extra year to do the PhD (although the same work cannot actually be submitted for two separate degrees).

Quote From Chemikalie89:
I applied for about 10 funded positions.0 interview, only encouraging messages and positive feedbacks.

I don't know what's wrong: my applications is good, my CV is good (I will graduate with 104/110, which is an upper second class), worked on my thesis for a year (doing research ALMOST by myself), good reference letters. But I'm not enough.

I have applied eveywhere: leeds, manchester, southampton, east anglia and Nottingham. Same results: unsuccessful.

Is it because I'm am a part-time student? because I haven't finished my exams yet (2 to go)? Cause I'm italian (don't think so, italians PhD students are appreciated abroad).

The only reason is cause I have only a BSc - which indeed is not english - and they may believe it's not enough.


It is so competitive. It is not that you are not good enough, but consider that you are up against other candidates who have a first class degree or a Masters, or who studied in the UK at a university the admissions team are already familiar with. Don't give up! I definitely think doing an MRes in the UK would be the best thing.

Thread: problem with one of the lecturers in the department

posted
16-May-16, 17:26
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posted about 4 years ago
I think I would talk to my supervisor, as you probably have a good reputation for not talking about people/being negative by the sound of it, so he will be aware of that and know that you are only saying something to protect yourself from any future attacks. But then again, it depends entirely on the dynamic of the department/staff-student hierarchy, and how much you think you can trust him and he will believe you.

I had a bad experience once where a lecturer tried to attack my character in a reference that she wrote (because I had chosen to do my PhD with a different lecturer, I think). Thankfully, it did not prevent me from getting my PhD funding (although what she wrote was pretty disgraceful). I think I was spared because it was obvious from my credentials and my other reference that what she had written was not true! Even though I had to continue working in the same department as her until she left a couple of months ago, I never raised the issue with my supervisor or any other lecturer. I was worried that she might try and attack me again, but thankfully (as far as I know) she didn't. If she had, I would have raised it as an issue. Maybe you could take that approach - make a written record of what she has done, and if she does anything else, raise it with your supervisor.

What do others suggest?

Thread: Mres and PhD

posted
16-May-16, 11:38
edited about 2 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
The MRes is specifically tuned to prepare you for a PhD (or other research based career). Make sure you study the course spec, as my MRes had A LOT of lectures (well, they were called seminars but were pretty much lectures in smaller groups) alongside carrying out the research project.

Thread: Struggles of a First Year PhD student

posted
13-May-16, 12:41
edited about 47 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
Hey! I'm sure, as others will tell you, feeling stupid is natural and OK. My advice is READ. Read and you will know. : ) It might help to keep a record of your reading, or already begin writing your literature review based on the reading you are doing (although of course you will edit it loads later).

Thread: Research methods/psychology/social sciences question

posted
13-May-16, 11:56
edited about 10 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
Quote From IntoTheSpiral:
I've been finding it very hard to publish my work with comments like "an interesting story in the presence of a failed experiment" - which is absolute crap. The experiment didn't fail, the experiment brought us closer to understanding a complex phenomenon. The initial hypotheses of the experiment were justified from our previous understanding of what was happening. Now, we're closer to knowing a bit more, which means that hopefully our next hypothesis will be closer.


Yes, I fully agree! And re the p value only problem! There are some really good APA journals that cover things like this (formal rants :D), and reading them is so refreshing!

Thread: Research methods/psychology/social sciences question

posted
13-May-16, 10:03
edited about 14 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
This has been a really interesting discussion. I think the conditions of academia (e.g., publish or perish, significant results usually needed TO publish, no real accountability, peer review, peers responsible for who gets promotion) mean that a lot of stuff out there may be codswallop.

The preregistration thing is progress. I know what you mean - I am seeing it a lot in psychology too. At a PhD student's presentation the other day I wanted to ask "so what are your hypotheses?", but two professors were present, one of them the supervisor of the PhD student who was presenting, and neither of them seemed to consider it an issue! I need to get braver. Maybe...

I'm usually an optimist. Just feel a bit disillusioned lately!

Thread: Research methods/psychology/social sciences question

posted
12-May-16, 11:20
edited about 9 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
Yes, I think that is what I shall be doing too.

Thread: Research methods/psychology/social sciences question

posted
12-May-16, 10:51
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posted about 4 years ago
That is exactly what I'm talking about. I am a quants person (so as to speak), but I took a masters module in qualitative research methods and came to respect it A LOT. There is a transparency and willingness to disclose possible biases, preconceptions, and the evolution of your thought processes and reasoning. This seems to be entirely missing in a lot of quantitative research. It is often presented as if it is almost divine, with no human intervention at all! Hello!!!

Thread: Research methods/psychology/social sciences question

posted
12-May-16, 10:06
edited about 38 seconds later
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posted about 4 years ago
Thanks people. I think I am just struggling with the notion that it should be a deductive approach with clearly set hypotheses that you test. For example: changing research questions based on what you observed in the data... I see this happening all the time in my research group and I am sure people do it all the time even when they don't state/explain it - they just present their evolved RQs as if they were the original ones. But this does not seem very "hypothetico-deductive". I don't think the scientific method as widely practiced is what people claim it to be. Or am I missing something here?!

Thread: Research methods/psychology/social sciences question

posted
11-May-16, 18:53
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posted about 4 years ago
Hello all

Couldn't quite think what to call this thread, and not quite sure how to word what I'm asking. Here goes...

When you design an experiment you review the literature and come up with research questions/hypotheses and ways to obtain and analyse data that will answer your research questions/test your hypotheses. What if, as I am sure is often the case, the data aren't as you predicted but you notice other interesting stuff in it. So you write up your results for the original questions and discuss your findings then explore further into what you found...

When does this become data "fishing"?

Thread: Possible fall out with superviso

posted
09-May-16, 14:55
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 years ago
Thursday isn't actually so bad - he may have been away for the weekend.

Good luck.

Thread: Possible fall out with superviso

posted
08-May-16, 18:10
edited about 28 seconds later
Avatar for Tudor_Queen
posted about 4 years ago
Hello

Sorry if it is an obvious question, but are you chasing it up when you don't hear back?

From what I've heard it is best not to make enemies/fall out with folk, as academia is a very small world and you'll see each other at conferences etc, not to mention the reference part!

Does anyone else have any experience of this?
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