Overview of Nesrine87

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Nesrine87
Friday, 14 November 2014 at 9:52am
Monday, 1 April 2019 at 9:01pm
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page 1 of 11 recent posts

Thread: Acknowledgements when your supervisors were awful

posted
18-Apr-19, 11:02
edited about 11 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
Quote From atleastitisover:
That is my point - I will have to acknowledge them but how to I do it politely without lying? I am looking for suggestions for how to word it.


I have a friend whose supervisor didn't help him much, so he included him in a big list without any 'special' thanks. I've reworded it slightly but here is what he wrote:

"Throughout these three years, many scholars advised me and provided invaluable assistance with my doctoral research. First and foremost, I would like to thank my academic supervisor, XXXXX; the thesis examiners, XXX and XXX; and the assessors for my transfer of status, XXX, XXX and XXX."

So, as you can see, he barely says anything detailed about his supervisor. Maybe that is helpful for you?

Thread: Training courses and/or skills on CV?

posted
10-Apr-19, 12:31
edited about 10 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
Thanks for this, Tudor! You and pm133 are always so helpful :)

I will try to make sure my cover letter is really tailored to the job spec - sometimes not easy when it's so vague! I will also try to get some feedback from someone who knows more about this than me.

Thread: Training courses and/or skills on CV?

posted
07-Apr-19, 12:52
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
Thanks for this, pm133 :)

Thread: Training courses and/or skills on CV?

posted
04-Apr-19, 10:57
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posted about 2 months ago
I very consciously want to avoid CV 'padding' but I wonder whether training courses might be considered relevant? Some job specs are so broad that it's difficult to tailor your CV.

These sorts of training course are highly specialised (e.g. handling and packing museum objects) but none ended up with qualifications. There are 6 courses in total and only one of them entailed a competitive application.

Alternatively, I could extract some of the stuff I learnt and put it in a 'Skills' section near the end of my CV.

My CV is otherwise pretty decent (couple of short-term research positions, articles, grants, conference papers, etc).

Thread: Brexit

posted
04-Apr-19, 10:51
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
Quote From Tudor_Queen:
Bored and not wanting to make final changes to thesis before submission,
Tudor


Hah! Guess I'm procrastinating too! My views haven't really changed and I'm unfortunately not surprised at the complete omnishambles that has transpired...to be honest, the news just stresses me out these days so I'm pretty ignorant as to the precise ins and outs of what's going on right now. I do make more of an effort to educate myself before I actually vote, I promise!

Thread: Conference... my results have now changed...

posted
01-Apr-19, 15:21
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
You sound like you're okay with things now but I just wanted to say that I agree with rewt. Conference papers are usually seen as works in progress that you're presenting in order to get feedback. No one reasonable would hold the new conclusions against you! It's a normal part of the process, as you say.

Thread: Conference presentations: do you always bring a handout?

posted
01-Apr-19, 15:16
edited about 23 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 2 months ago
Thanks for this, Tudor! Well it seems that I can probably leave the handouts. I am giving a paper in a couple of weeks and the subject is something I'm a bit less comfortable with so I'm second-guessing myself! Yes, it'll all be powerpoint slides. Thinking about 'the norm' is probably a good way to go - I wouldn't expect to see lots of handouts at a big conference, if only for logistical reasons.

Thread: Conference presentations: do you always bring a handout?

posted
27-Mar-19, 19:41
edited about 7 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
Quote From rewt:
I am in engineering and I never see handouts. I assume the audience knows basic stuff and add the occasional reference in the presentation itself. If they have further questions they can ask me in person but I am a very different field. Sorry I can't be more helpful.


No worries, thanks for responding!

Thread: Conference presentations: do you always bring a handout?

posted
27-Mar-19, 09:30
edited about 25 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
bump!

Thread: Conference presentations: do you always bring a handout?

posted
25-Mar-19, 10:15
edited about 8 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
My presentations are very visual (arts field) and often involve the discussion of several historical sources so I usually bring a handout that lists these sources with key info, mainly in case people want to look more into the topic. The only time I haven't done this is when I know the audience will be 50+ people. The audiences are always academic so I don't think it's necessary to explain basic concepts etc.

Do you always bring a handout for the audience? If not, what determines your decision? If so, what info do you normally include and why?

Thanks!

Thread: attending a workshop where my ex-supervisor is an invited speaker

posted
19-Mar-19, 17:20
edited about 15 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
I gather from your previous posts that your relationship with your previous supervisor ended acrimoniously? I'm not sure of the details. Please provide some extra details, if you think they're relevant.

Do you think seeing him/her would cause you significant distress? If so, don't go. No workshop is worth triggering some seriously negative emotions. You're allowed to give yourself time to recover.

However, is this going to be a recurring problem, i.e. will your ex-supervisor be at so many events that it impedes your ability to attend important workshops, conferences, etc? If you think you can stand it, it might be better to go to the event and participate but avoid direct confrontation.

How big is the workshop? I've attended small-ish workshops (around 20 people) and still didn't speak to everybody over 2-3 days.

When is the workshop and have you already confirmed your attendance? If it is soon, dropping out might make you look unprofessional (though obviously, allowances have to be made for sudden illnesses, emergencies, etc.). Whether you've paid for transport, accommodation, etc. might also factor into your decision (but it shouldn't be more important than your mental health).

Thread: Presentation etiquette (conferences)

posted
08-Mar-19, 11:12
edited about 8 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
Hi Tudor,

I've seen a lot of variety but in my field, it is quite normal to put just the name and affiliation. Some people put their job title and a logo (or multiple logos) too. Usually this is when the project has been clearly funded by a funding body and they need to say thanks publicly. I've not seen logos at the end of a presentation but I wouldn't think it was weird if someone did it. Usually, I put my name and email address with a 'thank you for listening' on the final slide. Hope that helps!

Thread: Listing rejected funding applications on new funding application?

posted
07-Mar-19, 14:08
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
Hmm, good point. I could send an email and ask. I can also ask some of the funding committee members as I know a couple of them. Thanks for this suggestion!

Thread: Listing rejected funding applications on new funding application?

posted
06-Mar-19, 15:24
edited about 1 minute later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
Quote From pm133:
The problem is that you say they ask for details of ALL funding requests for this work. If you omit something you could be in trouble.


Yes, this is certainly worth considering. However, I think I would probably be okay because the rejections were for very general research support awards, whereas I'm applying for a very specific directed grant to fund one part of my work. Anyway, thanks for your input! I will have a think about what to do.

Edit: just to clarify, I think omitting the previous awards wouldn't be an issue because they aren't actually connected to the current grant application.

Thread: Listing rejected funding applications on new funding application?

posted
06-Mar-19, 09:17
edited about 5 seconds later
Avatar for Nesrine87
posted about 3 months ago
Hi Tudor! Thanks for this. I think that could be a good idea, to just put one. They were both just 'general' awards, not specifically 'publication funding' (which is what I'm applying for) but it would at least show that I tried to get funding elsewhere. I was also planning on submitting another pending application so I'll have that on there too.
page 1 of 11 recent posts

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